‘Khuskh Taar O Khuskh Chob O Khuskh Post’ – Maulana Rumi

.
.
Parched hide, dried wood, frayed string
From where does the beloved’s voice ring?
Not the drum, nor the wood, or the string
From itself does the beloved’s voice spring
.
.
khushk taar o khushk chob o khushk post
(dry string and dry wood and dry hide)
az koja mi ayad in awaaz e dost
(from where comes the beloveds voice)
nai ze taar o nai ze chob o nai ze post
(not from string and not wood and not hide)
khud bakhud mi ayad in awaaz e dost
(from itself comes the beloved’s voice)
.
.
I had some trouble understanding the original verses before I settled on the final meaning of them. From what I understood, the string, wood and hide constitute a drum (which represents the body of the poet)- Rumi questions the ability of the physical phenomena that is his body to produce such divinely beautiful ideas and thoughts that is his poetry. He suggests that the source of these is somewhere other than the physical realm.
.
.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “‘Khuskh Taar O Khuskh Chob O Khuskh Post’ – Maulana Rumi

  1. Its a beautiful verse. The hide likely refers to the hide on the rebab, not on a drum. On hearing the beautiful sounds of the rebab, Rumi is perplexed how beautiful the sounds are that it is producing. He is surprised how dry strings of the rebab, the dry wood (of the body of the rebab) and the dry hide (behind the strings of the rebab) can portray such beauty as only love can. Love is wet, love is moist. So it must not be the hide, wood or strings that are producing the music. It is the heart of the musician. And God lives in the heart of the musician. Rumi concludes that the unstruck sound of love must comes from spontaneously, from none other than God in the heart of the musician. This metaphor is supremely expansive. Whatever beauty is produced in music or in poetry, comes from God. It comes spontaneously. Khud Bakhud. Beautiful poetry. Its worth singing and meditating upon.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s